Unable to connect to database - 09:29:57 Unable to connect to database - 09:29:57 SQL Statement is null or not a SELECT - 09:29:57 SQL Statement is null or not a DELETE - 09:29:57 Botany 2006 - Abstract Search
Unable to connect to database - 09:29:57 Unable to connect to database - 09:29:57 SQL Statement is null or not a SELECT - 09:29:57

Abstract Detail


Plenary Symposium: New Directions in Molecular and Organismal Botany

Burke, John M. [1].

Genetics and the Domestication of Crop Plants.

PLANT domestication has resulted in the production of a wide variety of crops that share a number of traits in common (collectively referred to as the "domestication syndrome"). Over the years, these rapid and dramatic morphological transformations have been the target of a number of genetic analyses. Not only have such studies provided insight into the dynamics of the domestication process, but they have also shed light on the genetic architecture of domestication-related traits. In general terms, the domestication syndrome has been found to be under relatively simple genetic control, although exceptions to this rule have been identified. In recent years, great progress has been made towards the identification of the genes underlying these types of traits. Perhaps most notably, analyses of patterns and levels of population genetic variation have made possible the identification of genes that experienced selection during domestication and/or improvement, and are thus candidates for genes underlying agronomically-important traits. In my talk I will provide an overview of these lines of inquiry, supplemented by data from my own research on sunflower domestication.


Log in to add this item to your schedule

1 - University of Georgia, Department of Plant Biology, Miller Plant Sciences Bldg., Athens, Georgia, 30602, USA

Keywords:
domestication
crop evolution
qtl mapping
selection
sunflower
Helianthus.

Presentation Type: Symposium or Colloquium Presentation
Session: 12-5
Location: 170/Holt
Date: Monday, July 31st, 2006
Time: 10:30 AM
Abstract ID:1021


Copyright 2000-2006, Botanical Society of America. All rights