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Abstract Detail


Systematics Section / ASPT

Harbaugh, Danica T. [1], Baldwin, Bruce G. [1].

Unraveling the complex history of sandalwoods (Santalum, Santalaceae).

THE sandalwoods, commonly known for their use in the fragrance industry, comprise the genus Santalum (Santalaceae), which includes approximately 15 extant species, 14 varieties, and 1 extinct species, ranging from India, Australia, Indonesia, the South Pacific, and the Bonin and Hawaiian Islands. Phylogenetic analysis of all currently recognized taxa in the genus reveals a complex history of hybridization and long-distance dispersal. Sequence data from ITS, ETS, 3ítrnK and waxy confirm the presence of several allopolyploid taxa in the genus, and provide evidence for broad-scale historical biogeographic patterns. A well-supported basal grade of taxa from Australia supports an origin of the genus on that continent. Multiple long-distance dispersal events from Australia must be postulated to account for the distribution of Santalum in India and the Pacific. Results support the earlier hypothesis of two independent colonizations of the Hawaiian Islands. Subsequent dispersal from Hawaii to the Bonin Islands and French Polynesia contradicts the common view of Hawaii as a sink rather than a source for dispersal events.


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1 - University of California, Berkeley, Department of Integrative Biology, University and Jepson Herbaria, 1001 Valley Life Sciences Bldg. #2465, Berkeley, California, 94720, USA

Keywords:
phylogeny
Santalum
Sandalwood
biogeography
Santalaceae
hybridization.

Presentation Type: Oral Paper:Papers for Sections
Session: 50-2
Location: 144/Performing Arts Center
Date: Tuesday, August 1st, 2006
Time: 2:15 PM
Abstract ID:114


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