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Abstract Detail


Human Transformation of California: Botany, History, and Sociology

Rice, Stanley A. [1].

Human transformation of California: botany, history, and sociology.

HUMANS have long had a transformative impact on California native plant habitats. As in many other areas of North America, the Native Americans of California managed fire, which maintained grasslands; fire suppression, under European and white American control of California, allowed the spread of shrubland and changes in montane forests. Fire suppression also influenced the chaparral. The Central Valley, which was once an extensive wetland, was transformed into a largely artificial, agricultural landscape by the diversion of water resources. The diversion of water resources has also strongly influenced the transmontane deserts. Introduction of exotic plant and animal species has had a strong impact on native ecosystems, particularly on the Channel Islands. The effects of these transformations has gone beyond the habitats themselves and influenced the history and sociology of California. This symposium offers a multidisciplinary approach to understanding these striking transformations. -DU


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1 - Southeastern Oklahoma State University, Biological Sciences, Box 4027, Durant, Oklahoma, 74701, USA

Keywords:
California
Human impact
Ecosystems
Fire suppression
Water resources
History
Human culture.

Presentation Type: Symposium or Colloquium Presentation
Session: 41-1
Location: 106/Ayres
Date: Tuesday, August 1st, 2006
Time: 8:45 AM
Abstract ID:5


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