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Abstract Detail


Genomics / Proteomics

dePamphilis, Claude W. [1], Zahn, Laura [1], Chanderbali, Andre [2], Cui, Liying [1], Wall, P. Kerr [1], Duarte, Jill Ricker [1], Zhang, Qing [3], Tian, Donglan [1], Hu, Yi [1], Landherr, Lena [1], Altman, Naomi [3], Leebens-Mack, Jim [1], Ma, Hong [1], Lindsay, Bruce G. [3], Soltis, Douglas E. [4], Soltis, Pamela S. [2], Oppenheimer, David [2], Carlson, John [5], Albert, Victor A. [6], Frohlich, Mike [7].

The Floral Genome Project: An overview and selected current findings.

VARIATIONS in floral structure are of major evolutionary and economic importance, impacting various plant processes such as pollination and gene flow, fruit production, and seed dispersal. Despite the central importance of the flower in plant biology, and huge strides made in understanding the molecular genetic basis of flower development in a growing number of model species, many fundamental questions concerning the origin and diversification of flowers remain. The Floral Genome Project ( http://www.floralgenome.org) is investigating the origin and diversification of the flower using an "Evolutionary Genomic" approach involving exemplars for basal angiosperm groups (Amborella, Nuphar, Liriodendron, Persea, Saruma) where most flower diversity is found, as well as basal monocot (Acorus) and eudicot (Eschscholzia) and other more derived lineages, and gymnosperm outgroups. To date, over 100,000 ESTs have been generated from cDNA libraries derived from reproductive organs in these species ( http://pgn.cornell.edu/). More than 75,000 new genes have been tagged, providing new sequence resources to help bridge the gaps between currently sequenced plant model systems. Although incomplete samples of the floral transcriptome, these sequences are the first examples of most regulatory gene families in the basal angiosperms. I will present a brief overview of the project and some of our current findings focusing on the sequence data, the central importance of genome duplication in angiosperm history, application of FGP sequences to plant phylogenetics, and insights gained from microarray expression studies that are helping to identify the genes that define floral organs and how they have diversified through angiosperm history.


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Related Links:
Floral Genome Project
Plant Genome Network


1 - Pennsylvania State University, Department of Biology, Institute of Molecular Evolutionary Genetics, and The Huck Institutes of the Life Sciences, University Park, Pennsylvania, 16802, USA
2 - University of Florida, Department of Botany, Florida Museum of Natural History, P.O. Box 117800, Gainesville, Florida, 32611-7800, USA
3 - Pennsylvania State University, Department of Statistics, University Park, Pennsylvania, 16802, USA
4 - University of Florida, Department of Botany, 220 Bartram Hall, P.O. Box 118526, Gainesville, Florida, 32611-8526, USA
5 - Pennsylvania State University, School of Forest Resources, and the Huck Institutes of the Life Sciences, University Park, Pennsylvania, 16802, USA
6 - University of Oslo, Botanical Garden, Natural History Museums and Botanical Garden, P.O. Box 1172 Blindern, Oslo, NO-0318, Norway
7 - Natural History Museum, Department of Botany, Cromwell Road, London, SW7 5BD, England

Keywords:
Genomics
evo-devo
gene trees.

Presentation Type: Oral Paper:Papers for Topics
Session: 61-3
Location: 268/Holt
Date: Tuesday, August 1st, 2006
Time: 3:45 PM
Abstract ID:736


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