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Abstract Detail


Bryological and Lichenological Section/ABLS

Reed, Margaret K. [1], Egan, Robert S. [2].

The Influence of Feedlot Emissions on Lichen Distribution and Abundance in Eastern Nebraska.

ENVIRONMENTAL factors greatly influence what species of lichens may occur in a particular region. Among these factors is nitrogen deposition in the form of ammonia as a result feedlot operations, which may be manifested by an increase in bark pH. Epiphytic lichens on trees located in close proximity to medium and large-scale feedlot operations in Eastern Nebraska were analyzed for bark pH levels, species composition and species abundance then compared to trees located at a greater distance from feedlot operations. Five sites were selected based on the presence of trees, accessibility, and proximity to livestock operations. Ten trees from each site were selected based on uniform diameter at breast height (dbh) and proximity to feedlot operations. In order to determine lichen coverage in cm2, high-resolution digital images were acquired then evaluated employing ERDAS Imagine 8.6, geospatial imagery analysis software. Bark material was collected from within 30 cm x 30 cm quadrats after images were acquired to identify lichen species. Analysis revealed that bark pH was higher near feedlot operations when compared to “control” sites, and that nitrophilous lichen species dominated all sites. A statistically significant increase in nitrophilous lichen coverage was observed on trees near feedlot operations when compared to trees located at a greater distance.


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1 - 6754 Blondo Street, Omaha, Nebraska, 68104, USA
2 - University of Nebraska Omaha, Department of Biology, 114 Allwine Hall, Omaha, Nebraska, 68182-0040, USA

Keywords:
nitrogen pollution
lichen ecology
air pollution
biomonitoring
substrate pH.

Presentation Type: Poster:Posters for Sections
Session: 48-1
Location: Auditorium/Bell Memorial Union
Date: Tuesday, August 1st, 2006
Time: 12:30 PM
Abstract ID:822


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