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Abstract Detail


The Comparative - Phylogenetic Method of Reconstructing Evolutionary History

Kramer, Elena M [1].

A molecular perspective on the reconstruction of morphological evolution.

JUST as understanding morphological evolution requires a clear picture of taxonomic relationships, a complete understanding of developmental evolution is dependent on reconstructing the evolution of gene lineages. Therefore, the first step in studying the evolution of genetic pathways that underlie morphological change is analyzing the phylogenetic relationships among the genes that participate in these pathways. The importance of this type of analysis will be discussed in the context of the floral organ identity program and the MADS box genes which play critical roles in this program. In particular, the evolutionary history of the APETALA3 and PISTILLATA gene lineages in the Ranunculales has the potential to shed light on the morphological diversification of this group. Current evidence suggests that duplications which occurred in these lineages have contributed to the evolution of novel types of floral organs via sub- and neofunctionalization. This hypothesis is being evaluated through the detailed analysis of gene expression patterns and mutant phenotypes.


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Related Links:
Kramer lab website


1 - Harvard Univerisity, Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, 16 Divinity Ave, Biolabs 1109, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 02138, USA

Keywords:
gene duplication
Ranunculales
MADS-box gene.

Presentation Type: Symposium or Colloquium Presentation
Session: 75-6
Location: 314/Bell Memorial Union
Date: Wednesday, August 2nd, 2006
Time: 4:30 PM
Abstract ID:834


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