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Abstract Detail


Conservation Biology

Showers, David [1], Nelson, Kent [1], Philipp, Mark [2].

Riparian Habitat Restoration at Decker Island.

SHOWERS*, D and K. Nelson 1 , M. Philipp2 1California Department of Water Resources, 901 P Street, Third Floor, P.O. Box 942836, Sacramento, CA 94236 2California Department of Fish and Game, 1701 Nimbus Road, Suite A, Rancho Cordova, CA 95670. Decker Island, in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, offers a rare opportunity to develop habitat that existed prior to dredging the Sacramento River and provides material for levee reinforcement on several Delta Islands. Decker Island is approximately 20 feet above sea level because of spoils that were deposited on the original marshland when the Sacramento River was dredged and straightened between 1917-1937. Exotic weeds and grasses developed on the dry, upland site, providing little habitat value. The projectís two phases developed 26 acres of native plant communities and wildlife habitats. Phase I was completed in December 2000 and restored 13.5 acres of habitat while Phase 2,constructed in 2004, created 12 additional acres of similar habitat. Approximately 600,000 cubic yards of material excavated from Decker Island was barged to various Delta islands to improve threatened levees. Decker Island habitat consists of a vegetated terrace and uplands with deep primary channels cut through the Island and open to the river. Two rare intertidal species, Masonís lilaeopsis (Lilaeopsis masoni) and Suisun Marsh aster (Aster lentus), benefit from the restoration. The Project creates a mosaic of different plant communities with varying canopy layers, vegetation type edges, and water/land interfaces. The Project restores tidal freshwater emergent, valley/foothill riparian, upland scrub, and grassland communities. Together, these habitats are designed to function within the Delta's natural hydrodynamic processes. The Project's levee integrity, water quality, water supply reliability, and threatened and endangered species protection benefits are consistent with the objectives of the California Bay Delta Authority, and the California state and federal Endangered Species Acts.


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1 - California Department of Water Resources, Delta-Suisun Marsh Office, 901 P Street, Third Floor, P.O. Box 942836, Sacramento, California, 94236, USA
2 - California Department of Fish and Game, Region 2 Office, 1701 Nimbus Road, Rancho Cordova, California, 95670, USA

Keywords:
restoration
Lilaeopsis
Aster lentus
Decker Island.

Presentation Type: Poster:Posters for Topics
Session: 48-63
Location: Auditorium/Bell Memorial Union
Date: Tuesday, August 1st, 2006
Time: 12:30 PM
Abstract ID:860


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