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Abstract Detail


Mycological Section

Nikumbh, Dilip Fula [1], Saler, Ramling Sidramappa [2].

Effect of Nutrients on Biomass Production of Alternaria Alternata (Fr) Keissler a Potentiol Pathogen of Onion (Allium cepa L).

ALTERNARIA alternata (Fr) Keissler was a potential pathogen of Onion, was isolated from diseased onion leaves from Nashik district and used for the present study. Pathogen was grown on the czapek-Dox liquid medium substituting or adding different carbon, nitrogen, amino acids and vitamin sources to study biomass production. The growth as dry mycelial biomass was observed on the 8th day of incubation period. A grate extent of growth variation were observed on different carbon, nitrogen, amino acid and vitamins. Among the carbon source, xylose shows maximum biomass while sucrose with minimum biomass. From nitrogen source ammonium ferrous sulfate shows maximum and sodium nitrate with minimum biomass was recorded. Among the amino acids serine with maximum and minimum on argenine. Riboflavin, ascorbic acid and thiamine has more favourable effect on the biomass production.


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1 - NDMVP Samajas Ozar college ,Ozar ( Mig ), Botany, Department of Botany, Ozar collge, Ozar (Mig),Tq Niphad Dist Nashik, Ozar (Mig ), Maharashtra, 422206, India
2 - NDMVP Samajs K.T.H.M.College,Nashik-2, `P.G.Department Botany, 17,Siddeshwar, Housing Society,Shivaji Nagar Sinnar-422103, Sinnar, Maharashtra, 422103, India

Keywords:
Alternaria alernata
Biomass
Onion
Pathogen.

Presentation Type: Poster:Posters for Sections
Session: 48-93
Location: Auditorium/Bell Memorial Union
Date: Tuesday, August 1st, 2006
Time: 12:30 PM
Abstract ID:869


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